From Orange/Family Ministry

Carey Orange 2014

Anticipating the Change You’re Not Expecting (Orange Conference 2015 Talk Notes)

This week I’m excited to be speaking at the Orange Conference in Atlanta Georgia.

As a way of serving those who attend my talks (and couldn’t be there but want to track with what’s happening) I’ll be posting the outline to each talk I give here on the blog.

Even if you don’t attend the conference, I hope you can glean a few insights from them that might help you lead better now.  And if you’re in the session, you won’t have to guess what that pesky blank you forgot to fill in was all about.

Here’s my talk outline for my Anticipating The Change You’re Not Expecting session, along with some additional posts and references if you want to go deeper.

Carey Orange 2014

Overview

Anticipating the change you’re not expecting.

Yes, we know that’s contradictory. But think back through the past few years: how many times did something blindside you when you should have seen it coming? The key to navigating personal and professional change lies in studying the people and organizations who’ve traveled further down your road.

Discover ways to learn from their lessons by doing your homework and looking ahead.

Introduction

1. At some point along the journey, most of us get blindsided.

 a. Leaders who see the future are in a better position to seize the future.

b. Knowing what’s coming is most of the battle.

4 Changes Most Leaders Aren’t Expecting

1. Growing Cynicism

a. Knowledge brings sorrow.

 b. You project past failures onto new situations.

c. You decide to stop trusting, hoping and believing.

d. The antidote to cynicism is curiosity.

2. Burnout

a. Most people don’t burnout overnight.

b. Passion fades.

c. Your heart grows hard.

d. Rest no longer refuels you.

e. You simply can’t function any more.

f. The antidote to self-medication is self-care.

3. Irrelevance

a. Irrelevance happens when the speed of change outside an organization is greater than the speed of change inside an organization. – Rick Warren

b. When you’re young, the current cultural dialogue is your native tongue.

c.  Culture never asks permissionto change. It just changes.

d. The older you get the harder this gets.

e.  Organizations that don’t change becomes museums to another era.

f. The antidote to irrelevance is change.

4. Ineffectiveness

a. Churches become ineffective when, over a long period of time, leaders begin to love the method more than they love the mission.

b. Leaders become ineffective when they fail to grow both their character and their competency.

c. Reinvention and renewal are the antidotes to ineffectiveness.

Two Questions to Help You See the Future So You Can Seize the Future

1. What am I not seeing that I should be seeing?

2. Who can help me see what I’m not seeing?

 Want More?

Here are some related posts that can help you dig deeper on this subject.

6 Reasons Leaders Grow Cynical (And How to Fight the Trend)

How Perry Noble Hit Rock Bottom While Pastoring One of America’s Largest Churches (Episode 2 of the CNLP)

9 Surefire Ways to Make Your Church Completely Ineffective

For further resources, access the free archive of thought-provoking, practical interviews with today’s top church leaders on The Carey Nieuwhof Leadership Podcast.

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7 Keys to Leading High Capacity Volunteers (Orange Conference 2015 Talk Notes)

This week I’m excited to be speaking at the Orange Conference in Atlanta Georgia.

As a way of serving those who attend my talks (and couldn’t be there but want to track with what’s happening) I’ll be posting the outline to each talk I give here on the blog.

Even if you don’t attend the conference, I hope you can glean a few insights from them that might help you lead better now.  And if you’re in the session, you won’t have to guess what that pesky blank you forgot to fill in was all about.

Here’s my talk outline for my 7 Keys to Leading High Capacity Volunteers session.

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Introduction

As a leader, you aspire to attract, keep and grow a team of high-capacity volunteers. But are you dreaming the impossible dream? Learn to keep your vision grounded by starting with a look at the flipside: where and why you’re losing your top volunteers.

Then take a guided tour through the 7 key ways to get your best people on board… and keep them there.

7 Keys To Leading High Capacity Volunteers

1. Give them a significant challenge.

a. People with significant leadership gifting respond best to significant challenges.

2. Continually communicate your mission, vision and strategy.

a. Mission and vision unite.

b. Strategy begins as divisive, but ultimately aligns a church.

3. Be organized

a. Few things are more demotivating to a volunteer than discovering the staff person didn’t set you up to succeed.

b. Some people will put with disorganization, but high capacity leaders will ultimately give up.

4. Refuse to let people off the hook

a. Your organization will drift to the level of accountability the team leader establishes.

b. Ask yourself, whom would I rather lose: highly motivated volunteers or poorly motivated volunteers?

5. Play favorites

a. Spend 80% of your time with the people who give you 80% of your results.

6. Surround high capacity people with high capacity people.

Like attracts like and like keeps like.

7. Pay them in nonfinancial currencies.

a. People gravitate most toward where they are valued most.

b. 5 non-financial currencies:

 I. Gratitude

II. Attention

III. Trust

IV. Empowerment

V. Respect

Want More?

Here are some related posts that can help you dig deeper on this subject.

7 Questions Every Volunteer Asks But Never Says Out Loud

How to Get Your Volunteers to Own Your Mission Like Staff (CNLP 020 With Frank Bealer)

6 Very Avoidable Reasons You’re Losing High Capacity Volunteers

For further resources, access the free archive of thought-provoking, practical interviews with today’s top church leaders on The Carey Nieuwhof Leadership Podcast.

5 Reasons Churches Stop Growing (Orange Conference 2015 Talk Notes)

This week I’m excited to be speaking at the Orange Conference in Atlanta Georgia.

As a way of serving those who attend my talks (and couldn’t be there but want to track with what’s happening) I’ll be posting the outline to each talk I give here on the blog.

Even if you don’t attend the conference, I hope you can glean a few insights from them that might help you lead better now.  And if you’re in the session, you won’t have to guess what that pesky blank you forgot to fill in was all about.

Here’s my talk outline for my 5 Reason Churches Stop Growing session.

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Synopsis

It may not be wise to measure your church’s health by exactly how many people showed up on Sunday or attended your new member class last month. But stalled growth can be a sign of deeper problems. Whether your church is stuck or has momentum, take a look at the 5 big reasons churches stop growing, and figure out how you can get – or keep – moving again.

I.  Introduction

  1. Church growth is not as mysterious as we think.

2. In one way or another, healthy things grow.

II. 5 Reasons Church Stop Growing

1. You are more in love with the method than you are with the mission.

a. Your church’s passion for the past or present is more compelling than your vision for the future.

b. You’re afraid to risk what is for the sake of what could be.

2. Your structure is designed to keep you small.

a. The clergy-based model is designed to keep a church under 200 attenders.

b. If you want the impact of a supermarket, you can’t run things like a mom and pop store.

Church governance is often more of a hindrance than a help to growth.

3. You don’t understand the people you’re trying to reach.

a. 48% of millennials are classified as postChristian.

b. Family has changed significantly.

c. Culture is undergoing a massive shift.

4. You’ve bet too much on being cool.

a. What you define as contemporarymay not be contemporary.

b. Authentic is more powerful than cool.

5. You’re really not willing to change.

a. The gap between what you say and what you actually do is too large.

b. You are unwilling to plot trajectory.

c. You’re afraid (and the team hasn’t realized you can’t follow fear)

 

III. Moving Forward

  1. Create a white hot sense of mission.
  1. Structure for growth.
  1. Understand and love the people you’re trying to reach.
  1. Be authentic.
  1. Commit to change.

Want More?

Here are some related posts that can help you dig deeper on this subject.

10 Reasons Even Committed Church Attenders Are Attending Less Often

5 Reasons People Have Stopped Attending Your Church (Especially Millennials)

10 Very Possible Reasons Your Church Isn’t Growing

For further resources, access the free archive of thought-provoking, practical interviews with today’s top church leaders like Andy Stanley, Perry Noble, Jon Acuff, Kara Powell, Ron Edmondson, Derwin Gray, Mark Batterson and more on The Carey Nieuwhof Leadership Podcast.

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8 Ways to Get the Most From Orange Conference 2015 (Even If You’re Not There)

I am super excited, because this week (Wednesday April 29-Friday, May 1st) I’m excited to be speaking at the Orange Conference in Atlanta Georgia, where over 6500 leaders from around the world will gather to talk about how to best make an impact on the next generation.

Speakers include Perry Noble, Reggie Joiner, Jon Acuff, Jud Wilhite, Jeff Henderson, Jenni Catron, Kara Powell and more.

One of my very favourite things to do in this life is connect with other leaders who are trying to make a difference in the local church, whether as staff or volunteers. Gonna spend three days doing that this week…and I hope if you’re there, we get a chance to say hey!

I’ll make the rounds in different spots throughout the conference, but am so stoked to be hosting the Senior Leader Track again this year. That’s where you’ll find me most of Wednesday and Thursday.

And…(I think this is really cool) there will be a very limited advance run of my brand new leadership book available at the conference! See below for more.

But you don’t have to be there to get all the benefit. So how do you get the most out of a conference, even if you can’t be there?

Well, here are 8 tips. The first one is just because…well, I’m excited.

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1. Snap Up An Advance Run Copy of My New Book, Lasting Impact

Okay, so this is an Orange Conference exclusive.

I’m so pumped that my publisher has made a limited edition, advance reader’s edition of my new leadership book, Lasting Impact: 7 Powerful Conversations That Will Help Your Church Grow available only at the conference. Everyone worked so hard to get it ready for this week!

How advance run is it? Well, I haven’t even got a copy yet. I’ll see it when you see it!

The book focuses on 7 key issues almost every church is struggling with, and it’s designed to facilitate 7 conversations that will help your church grow and have a lasting impact.

Here’s the jacket:

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The full release version of the book comes out in the summer of 2015. I’ll keep you posted.

If you want to be on the inside track for the release of Lasting Impact, just sign up here for free.

2. Connect In Person At My Meet Up

Never done this before at Orange Conference, but this year I’m hosting a meet up on Wednesday, April 29th. If you want to connect, ask a question, meet other leaders or otherwise connect personally, I’d love to see you.

Register here. Tickets are totally free, but space is limited so hop on to RSVP today!

It will be so fun to hang out!

3. Follow the Hashtags

One of the easiest ways to track everything that’s happening is through some nifty hashtags whether you’re at the conference or at home. Most of my personal updates at the conference will be via twitter or Instagram, but I will make occasional ventures onto Facebook (where hashtags work less well).

The hashtags are perfect for those who don’t attend, but will optimize the experience for those who do.

#OC15 is the official conference hashtag.

#OC15Live is the official hashtag of the live stream (see #6 below)

#CNLP is my personal hashtag. I’ll be checking that hashtag regularly, and use that hashtag if you have a question for me. I’ll be saving the best questions for a bonus edition of my podcast I’ll be releasing after OC 15. What does #CNLP stand for? It’s short for the Carey Nieuwhof Leadership Podcast. (Now you know…but I’ll use it for anything directed at me.:))

4. Live Tweeting

I’ll be live tweeting much of the conference, and my sessions will also be live tweeted (thanks to my assistant, Sarah). That will make it easy to follow along.

Just follow me on Twitter to catch the latest.

5. Periscope!

Have you discovered Periscope yet? I stumbled on it last month and think it’s amazing. It’s basically live video streaming made simple. Just hit the App Store to download it for free. 

I’ll be doing some live segments using Periscope throughout the conference…just for fun.

Notifications of live broadcasts will push to your phone if you follow me. I’m simply cnieuwhof on Periscope…it’s integrated with twitter but you can use the app to follow me directly.

6. Live Blogging Session Notes

I’m teaching three sessions at the conference, all brand new talks for Orange Conference this year.

My notes will go live here on my blog when my talks start. It’s a courtesy to people sitting in my talks (a companion to taking notes), but in past years, many who haven’t been at the conference have appreciated them too.

5 Reasons Churches Stop Growing notes will go live Wednesday, April 29th at 11:00 a.m. EDT.

7 Keys to Leading High Capacity Volunteers will go live Wednesday, April 29th at 3:00 p.m. EDT.

Anticipating the Change You’re Not Expecting will go live Thursday, April 30th at 4:45 p.m. EDT

Also, my friend Brian Dodd will be live blogging the entire conference.

Brian is a leadership blogging machine…so make sure you check his site regularly. There’s no one like Brian when it comes to leadership!

7. Live Stream!

So you can’t make it? Orange Conference has a live stream. You might not get every session, but you’ll get a ton, I mean a ton, of the experience.

I’ll be doing a live interview on the stream Friday at 1:45 p.m. with Jared Herd and Elle Campbell. That is always so much fun. (We’ll periscope that interview too…just for fun.)

Follow the live stream at www.theorangeconference.com.

8. Evernote

Okay..now a bonus tip. Ever wonder how to synthesize the best learnings you’re trying to capture?

My hands-down top choice for note taking is Evernote. I know almost everyone knows about Evernote, but if you’re not using it at conferences, you’re missing out. Evernote’s free primer on how to use it will get you started if you’re new to it.

I love that I can do a search through the last few years of Orange Conference notes simply by searching “Orange Conference”, or the name of the speaker, or a key word, or anything I might half remember. It always calls it up. And you can be far more organized for that. And it syncs seamlessly across all devices. Brilliant.

I write a lot of my blog posts on it while offline, write all my podcast interview questions on it, outline my talks in it and do so much more.

Anyway, I hope this helps you get the most out of Orange Conference 2015.

If you’re there, I can’t wait to say hi. If you’re watching online, make sure you shout out on social media.

It’s going to be an incredible week.

10 Things Your Kids Will Learn from Your Marriage

I’m on vacation with my family, and today’s post is a guest post from Doug Fields.

Doug is one of the leaders who has set the pace for student ministry leaders over the last number of years, and he’s weathered the tensions that inevitably arise between leaders and ministry only to come out strong in both areas. Doug recently coauthored the book Married People with Ted Lowe.

By Doug Fields

When I speak on marriage, I’m always asked if I intentionally taught my kids about marriage.

The answer is yes… and, no.

Yes, there are times when we’ve talked specifically about marriage (either ours or ones that our kids have observed). But, for the most part, Cathy and I have been wise enough to know that our kids are constantly watching and learning from us without us having to do a lot of talking.

Our actions (both good and bad) are always teaching them about marriage.

I would be thrilled if my kids had a similar type of marriage that Cathy and I share… it’s definitely not perfect, but we’re both very proud of what we’ve developed over 27+ years.

 

10 Actions My Kids Have Caught Over the Years

Here are 10 actions that I know my kids have observed from us over the years:

 

1. Affection

Cathy & I are very affectionate and I like having my kids see me holding their mom’s hand, hugging, kissing, cuddling, etc… as often as I can.

 

2. Saying “I’m sorry”

 I want to be quick to use this phrase and I want my kids to hear me say it (and I have to say it a lot more than Cathy).

 

3. Affirmation

This is my primary love language so it’s easy for me to dish out encouraging words.

My kids get a lot of verbal affirmation, but they also hear me directing it toward my wife (which is really easy).

 

4. Attraction

I think Cathy is hot… and, I make it known around our family. I’ll regularly say, “Isn’t your mom beautiful?”

 

5. Time

Our kids know that we like to spend time together. When they see us steal time away to sit in the backyard and talk, or go in the hot tub, or go on a date night, or sneak away for the weekend…that’s a good message I want them to see.

 

6. Laughter

We laugh a lot in our house and my wife’s cute sense of humor cracks me up. I like having my kids see that my wife makes me laugh.

 

7. Respect

Opening the door for Cathy, saying “thank you” and “please” and showing her simple signs of respect.

 

8. Faith conversations

We’re not always praying in front of our kids, but they hear and see our faith conversations and know that we’re always talking about Jesus and what it means to be a follower.

 

9. The value of friends

Our house is well worn from the traffic of friends in/out of our house.

We love having people over and the Fields’ house is a regular hangout for some incredible friends.

 

10. Servanthood

I know my kids have had a better example in Cathy than with me because she’s the ultimate servant. Always asking, “How can I help? What do you need to make life better?” Serving one another is seen in the daily, little things and there’s many opportunities to serve.

 

Kids are always watching their parent’s marriage and yet too many marriages underestimate the power of modeling!

Children are taking daily recordings of what a marriage looks like and those recordings are definitely influencing and shaping their view of marriage.
Question: Do you have intentional actions that you’re modeling to your kids? Do you have some actions that are different from the ones I’ve listed?

If you do…leave a comment!

Special Offer This Week

My friends over at Orange Books are offering some great deals this week.

You can get any of the deals, any day this week, but, as a leader who’s passionate about people’s marriages, I wanted to highlight today’s featured deal:

 

9780989021333.ePUB

Buy one copy of the book Married People, and get all of this:

• “Why Marriage Ministry Is Doable for Every Church” (Orange Conference 2014 breakout by Ted Lowe, audio file)

• “Married and in Ministry” (Orange Conference 2014 breakout by Ted Lowe and Doug Fields, audio file)

• an annual subscription to MarriedPeople E-ZINE

Plus, when you tweet or share any of the deals on Facebook, you’ll be entered to win a prize.

Just go to to orangebooks.com, click on the Married People book and place your order.

So…what are some things your kids are picking up…for better or for worse? Leave a comment.

How To Stop Your Church From Growing Old (Orange Conference 2014 Talk Notes)

So how do you stop your church from growing old…you know, to the point where you’re all 60 years old and wondering what happened to all the young families?

It’s a question every church leader either struggles with, or ought to struggle with.

This week I’m excited to be speaking at the Orange Conference in Atlanta Georgia.

As a way of serving those who attend my talks I’ll be posting the outline to each session here on the blog.

Even if you don’t attend the conference, I hope you can glean a few insights from them that might help you lead better now.  And if you’re in the session, you won’t have to guess what that pesky blank you forgot to fill in was all about.

So here’s the outline for my talk on how to stop your church from growing old.

Synopsis

It’s so easy for churches to lose touch with what families are going through. In this session, we’ll look at practical ways to make sure your church keeps speaking “family” through the generations, both in terms of content and in how you structure yourself to stay relevant.

1. How did we get here?

a. Irrelevance is always subtle but inevitable.

b. The bacon cheeseburger syndrome: everyone wants your church to grow…just not change.

c. The Google syndrome: the greatest enemy of your future success is your current success.

2. How do we get out of here?

a. Match your model to your mission. In most churches, the model doesn’t not match the mission.

b. Recruit next generation leaders to help you do it. The most effective strategies to reach the next generation will likely not come from the current generation.

c. Adopt a strategy to intentionally reach families.

3. Where do we go from here?

1. Design a main worship services that engages teenagers.

2. Decide you are not going to try to please everyone.

3. Develop an intentional strategy to impact families.

i.  Resource your family ministry team.

ii.  Synchronize your team around a master plan designed to reach families.

iii.  Refine your message.

iv.  Elevate community.

v.  Partner with parents.

Want to go deeper? These related posts may be helpful:

11 Traits of Churches That Will Impact the Future

9 Signs your Church Is Ready to Reach Unchurched People

7 reasons Churches that Want to Reach Unchurched People Don’t 

Further Information:

Think Orange by Reggie Joiner

Parenting Beyond Your Capacity by Reggie Joiner and Carey Nieuwhof

Lead Small by Reggie Joiner and Tom Shefchunas

Creating a Lead Small Culture by Reggie Joiner, Kristen Ivy and Elle Campbell

Deep and Wide by Andy Stanley

Leading Change Without Losing It by Carey Nieuwhof

Want to stay completely on top of things? Sign up for my email list (near the upper right under my photo).

You’ll get a free ebook on reaching unchurched people, plus every post via email in a weekly digest and bonuses I send to my subscribers from time to time that no one else gets. 

Got questions or thoughts you’d like to share? Leave a comment!

Starting a Church For Unchurched Families (Orange Conference 2014 Talk Notes)

Want to reach young families, but not sure how to approach post-modern, post-Christian families who live in your neighbourhood? This post is for you.

This week I’m excited to be speaking at the Orange Conference in Atlanta Georgia.

As a way of serving those who attend my talks I’ll be posting the outline to each session here on the blog.

Even if you don’t attend the conference, I hope you can glean a few insights from them that might help you lead better now.  And if you’re in the session, you won’t have to guess what that pesky blank you forgot to fill in was all about.

Here’s my talk outline on Starting a Church for Unchurched Families.

 

Synopsis

You’ve probably figured out by now that the beliefs and value systems of an “unchurched person” are different than they were ten years ago.OC 14 YES

You also might have noticed that families in your community aren’t what they used to be. So, with all the change, how do you create a ministry to effectively reach the families in your community?

In this breakout, we’ll look at 12 characteristics of today’s unchurched families and discuss what these characteristics mean for your ministry.

 

Family in a Post-Modern, Post-Christian Culture

 1. In the world of family, ­­­everything’s changing.

2. It’s almost impossible to reach people you don’t like or understand.

3. Unchurched people listen most to the people they like the most.

4. Most churches for unchurched people begin with churched people. The problem is that most stay that way.

5. Place churched people who love, accept and know unchurched people in your key positions.

 

12 Characteristics of Today’s Unchurched Families

 

 1. They don’t come back when they have kids.

a. 50% of parents said that having children did not affect their connection to a church.  (Even many churched parents said that children did not change their level of churchgoing.)

b. 5% of unchurched parents said that having children helped them become active in a church for the first time.

 

2.They feel less guilty than you think.

a. Unchurched people feel no more guilty about missing church on a Sunday than you feel about missing synagogue on a Saturday.

b. Guilt is a short-term motivator.

 

3. When they attend, they attend less often.

a. Small Groups can provide the motivation for people to come more regularly.

b. No one should be able to out-community the local church.

c. Disconnected families generally don’t stick.

d. They will become your best inviters if they like your ministry.

 

4. Most are spiritual

a. Most unchurched people believe in some kind of God.

b. Respecting their past journey better enables them to start a new journey.

 

5. They’re intelligent, just not biblically literate.

a. Be inclusive without being condescending

 

6. They want you to be Christian. Be authentically Christian.

a. Don’t alter the content of your services for unchurched people, alter the approach and experience.

 

7. They expect transparency.

a.  admire your strengths, but they resonate with your weakness.

 

8.They struggle with every social issue you were hoping to avoid.

a. You can’t hold non-Christian people accountable for Christian values

b. Have conversations.

c. Allow ministry to precede theology.

 

9. Their kids matter to them… maybe even more than they should.

a. Safe is even more important than ‘right’ to families.

b. What you spend on families communicates value to unchurched families.

c. The quality of your team determines the quality of their experience with you.

 

10. They are looking for partners.

a. They’re looking for partners; they’ve just never thought the church could help.

b. Strategy is almost more important than content when it comes to partnering with parents.

 

11. They need help with the homeside of the Orange strategy

a. They are not sure what “Christian” means.

b. They do not have a precedent for what a Christian home looks like. So you need to make that clear.

 

12. They do not follow a predictable spiritual growth curve.

a. Design a flexible on ramp.

b. Think steps, not programs.

c. Maturity takes time.

d. Relationships matter most.

 

If you want to go deeper, here are some related posts that can help you and your team:

15 Characteristics of Today’s Unchurched Person

Why We Need a Different Kind of Maturity in the Church

How to Responds as People Attend Church Less Often

Want to stay completely on top of things?

Sign up for my email list (near the upper right under my photo). You’ll get a free ebook on reaching unchurched people, plus every post via email in a weekly digest and bonuses I send to my subscribers from time to time that no one else gets. 

Got questions or thoughts you’d like to share? Leave a comment!

5 Traits of Future Churches (Orange Conference 2014 Talk Notes)

Ever wonder what the future church will look like?

This week I’m excited to be speaking at the Orange Conference in Atlanta Georgia.

As a way of serving those who attend my talks I’ll be posting the outline to each session here on the blog.

Even if you don’t attend the conference, I hope you can glean a few insights from them that might help you lead better now.  And if you’re in the session, you won’t have to guess what that pesky blank you forgot to fill in was all about.

So here’s the outline for my talk on 5 Traits of Future Churches.

Synopsis

OC 14 altWill your ministry have the same kind of momentum tomorrow that you have today?

Will your church be effective at reaching your community five years from now?

In this breakout we will discuss what you can do to get your church ready for tomorrow, today.

Introduction

1. Everything’s changing.

2. “Change is not an option. How you respond to it is.” —Reggie Joiner

3. “To reach people no one else is reaching, we need to do things no one else is doing.”—Craig Groeschel

4. Future-oriented leaders position their church today to make an impact tomorrow.

Five Traits of Churches That Will Impact the Future

 

1. Future churches commit to the message but are flexible with the method.

Three keys to keep your method current:
 

a. Clearly distinguish between mission, vision and strategy.

b. Evaluate regularly.

c. Be absolutely honest.

Will you display flexibility with the method (even the ones you introduced)?

 

2. Future churches give people a place to belong before they believe.

Reaching unchurched people effectively begins with ministry, not theology.

Belong – Because you can belong even before you believe.

Believe – Because those who belong often start to believe.

Become – Because everyone who believes can become someone new.

 Will you give people space to belong before they believe?

 

 3. Future churches value online relationships as real relationships.

 1. How will you respond if the majority of the population decides to never set foot in a building on Sunday morning for a shared experiences?

2. Three Keys to Embracing Online Connections:

a.Actually connect with social media

b. SEO optimize local, helpful content.

c. Use multiple channels.

 Will you value online relationships as real relationships?

 

4. Future churches embrace quicker, lighter, smaller footprints.

 Quicker = Speed. The speed of future growth will be impacted by the speed of decision making.

Lighter = Fewer resources. Lower cost venues mean higher growth. Portable will become a permanent part of the future.

Smaller = Size.  A greater number of smaller venues can ultimately accommodate more people.

 How are you preparing for quicker, lighter, smaller footprints?

 

5. Future churches encourage experimentation.

1.  The greatest threat to your future success is your current success.

2. Consolidation always happens before a major shift in history.

3. There is no pattern yet for future church.

4. Three ways to experiment:

a. Devote 10% of your time and budget to things you’re not sure will work out.

b. Reward the effort but evaluate the result.

c. Don’t allow what’s good to block what has the potential to be great.

 Are you prepared to risk failure to ensure your future success?

If you want to go deeper, here are some related posts that can help you and your team:

11 Traits of Churches That Will Impact the Future

Why Portable Church Should Be A Permanent Part of the Future

Revivals Are Dead: 5 Things That Will Never Be the Same Again

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Got questions or thoughts you’d like to share? Leave a comment!

The 5 Temptations of a Church Leader, Husband & Dad

Almost all of us lead in at least two areas of our lives: at work and at home.

Personally, I’ve been a husband to Toni for 24 years, a dad for 22 years (raising two pretty amazing sons (ages 22 and 18)), and a church leader for 19 years (this week!).

All of them have been incredibly rewarding. And each of them has had its challenges. And each area has had its temptations.

But if you’re a church leader, you probably also realize there are unique challenges to leading at church and leading at home. And some unique temptations.

 

holding hands

 

Orange—The Colour of Leaders and Families

No organization has helped me navigate the complexity of family better than Orange. They call it Orange because red+yellow is a far more vibrant colour than just red or yellow, just like family+church is a far more powerful combination than just church or family.

Reggie Joiner, who leads Orange, is not only one of my best friends, but also someone who understands the leadership issues in church and the leadership/relational issues at home better than anyone I know. He has helped me navigate so many of the tensions I talk about in this post.

This week also happens to be Orange Conference week, when over 5000 leaders from across North America and around the world will gather in Atlanta to talk church and family. If you’ve never been, you have no idea what an incredible time of fun, challenge, strategy and personal growth you might be missing.

To Orange conference week started, I thought I’d offer a personal post on 5 temptations I’ve experienced being a church leader, husband and dad.

5 Temptations of a Church Leader, Dad and Husband

I could probably list a lot more than five temptations, but these are the five I either find myself talking to church leaders about most, or think I should talk to church leaders about more. And they’re the five I’ve felt or experienced.

Church leadership is emotional. It’s personal. It combines what you believe with who you are and what you do, and throws your family and community into the mix, which is why it can seem so complicated at times. (I wrote more about the emotional side of ministry here.)

So what do you do about it? Just keep your thinking and your heart clear. Keep praying. Keep getting wise counsel around you. Stay humble. Stay transparent. Stay as obedient as possible in every moment.

Here are 5 temptations I’ve experienced being a church leader, dad and a husband:

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5 Reasons Every Senior Leader Should Get Passionate About Families

I’m a senior pastor.

And like most senior pastors I delegate much of the ministry that goes on to staff and volunteers so I can focus on leadership, communication and raising up teams and resources around our mission.

It’s tempting to delegate the cause of family and kids to our family ministry team and leave it at that.

And that’s the mistake most senior leaders make. Again and again.

Every time you do that, you risk jeopardizing your mission and your future.

Here’s why.

 

Over the years, I’ve become convinced that the better we engage families, the strong our mission becomes. Lose families (in all of their forms), and you lose the future.

So here are 5 reasons why every senior leaders should be passionate about families:

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