From Leadership

alignment

5 Ways An Aligned Team Is A Better Team (What I’ve Learned From North Point)

Ever wonder what would happen if you got everyone in your church or organization moving in the same direction?

For the last seven years, I’ve led a North Point Strategic Partner Church and have learned so much about the benefit of having an aligned church. One of the key benefits of a simple church model (which North Point and its partners practice) is alignment.

Alignment happens when you have a team of people – from the top leadership right through to the newest volunteer – pulling in the same direction not only around the same goals, but using the same strategy.

Seems simple, but it isn’t.

Everybody I talk to is in favour of aligning their organization (why have hundreds of people working at crossed purposes?), but few people seem to be able to pull it off.

Rarely have I seen an organization more intentional about alignment than North Point.

When people approach us as a partner church, few leaders ever ask us about alignment. But as they are leaving after some time with us, they inevitably remark on the level of ownership the staff and volunteers have.

I agree. Team and organizational alignment is a powerful thing when it happens.

That’s the power of alignment. To get very different people rallied around a common cause is a wonderful thing.

An aligned team, quite simply, is a better team.

alignment

Here are five benefits to working in an aligned organization:

1. Alignment creates a badly needed dividing line 

Being everything to everyone is pretty much the same as being nothing to everyone.

Few organizations struggle with this more than the church. Alignment forces you to be about a few defined things rather than about everything (aka nothing).

Once you choose the things you are going to do and align around it, the people who want you to be about everything will sometimes leave, but that’s okay.

Being aligned almost always means you will accomplish more.

2. Alignment forces out personal agendas 

I learned this early on from Andy Stanley.

When the organization’s agenda becomes clear and the main priority for everyone, it forces out competing personal agendas.

Everything from politics to selfish personal goals get squeezed out.

Why does alignment do this? Well, alignment forces out personal agendas, because leaders commit to something bigger than themselves.

3. Alignment does not mean full agreement; it means full focus 

Critics of alignment say that alignment means you snuff out independent thought and, in its extreme form, create a culture of yes people. I disagree.

Most high capacity leaders actually want to work in an environment that is going to produce results.

Alignment around key objectives does that.

Alignment does not mean full agreement; it means full focus.

4. Alignment removes all excuses

We’ve had several staff join us our team who used to be part of other, less aligned organizations.

Within a year, they had the same experience I did once we got our teams fully aligned: all your excuses for a lack of progress disappear.

You can’t blame anyone else because everyone actually supports you and your agenda—because there is only one agenda.

This allows you to realize your potential, but the excuses you used to use for lack of results are gone. And church leaders can be notorious excuse makers.

5. Alignment allows you to harness more creativity, not less

Counterintuitively, having a common mission and strategy means that your team can harness greater – not lesser – creativity.

Because you agree on direction and priorities, you spend significant time getting creative about implementing your vision.

You no longer waste hours debating what to do. Instead, you can spend hours getting better at what you’ve agreed you’ll do.

What About You?

If you are facing internal or external resistance to alignment, I want to encourage you to move past that resistance. You’ll be so glad you did.

That’s what I’m learning and enjoying about being part of an aligned organization. What are you discovering?

Reinvention: The 5 Different Leaders You Need to Become To Stay Effective

You’ve heard it said here more than a few times, you are the hardest person you will ever have to lead.

How do I know that? Because I’m the hardest person I have to lead.

It was 20 years ago this year that I moved my then-young family up to just north of Toronto to begin ministry. Although the form has changed as I moved from a denominational context to planting Connexus Church, there have been a core of leaders who have been with me from the very start.

The ministry has grown from 45 people in attendance and 100 people who would have called our original churches home in 1995, to 1000 in attendance and 2200 people who call our church home today.

The one thing that’s been constant in all of it is change.

And the one thing that’s been even more consistent is that I’ve had to change as a leader.

In many ways, our church has had 5 different pastors over the last two decades. They just all happened to be me.

Why? Because I had to keep reinventing myself and my leadership again and again to remain effective as a leader and as a Christ follower.

The same is true of you.

If you’re going to lead over the long haul, you need to reinvent yourself again and again.

If you don’t, you’ll simply stagnate as a leader and drift toward ineffectiveness. And something inside you will die too—like your soul.

So how exactly do you reinvent yourself? And what do you need to reinvent?

Here are some thoughts.

Stage 1: The Instinctive Leader

Most leaders start out operating from their instincts or defaults.

Your instincts will get you places. And they’ll work for you for a season.

After all, you’re new. And sometimes the combination of a fresh face and the passion you have when you’re young will get you a long way in leadership. At least at first.

My instinctive leadership style is aggressive, clear, focused and direct (I was a lawyer before I was a pastor…so forgive me). Those are strengths, and they helped a lot in the early days.

If you think about it, you’ll be able to recognize your default leadership instincts. Just look at how you naturally behave.

Following your instincts is almost always how every leader behaves within the first few years of leadership.  It will get you started, but they certainly won’t take you all the way.

 

Reinvention 1: The Emotionally Intelligent Leader

Many of you were already chafing at my instinctive leadership style (aggressive, clear, focused and direct). And, honestly, it rubs some people the wrong way.

Your first reinvention as a leader has to happen when you realize your strengths have accompanying weaknesses.

The best leaders aren’t just intelligent, they’re emotionally intelligent.

The key to emotional intelligence is self-awareness.

As a result, wise leaders develop ‘learned behaviours’. Learned behaviours are simply behaviours you adopt to compensate for the edges of your strengths. For example, I’ve had to learn to listen, to be gracious, to be compassionate and to value the input of others.

It’s a little embarrassing to admit I had to learn those things, but it’s true.

There are behaviours you have to learn too. If you’re not sure what they are, just look for characteristics that are the opposite of your gift set or, better yet, ask people around you. They’ll tell you.

Reinvention 2: The Leader of Leaders

If you’re a bit gifted, it will easy to rely on your own charisma, gifts and skills to help grow the ministry. Don’t make that mistake.

Growing things all by yourself just doesn’t scale well, and it’s not sustainable. Eventually, things will implode and you’ll end up leading only the people you can personally impact directly.

If you’re going to lead well over the long haul, you have to learn to lead others well. And more than that, you have to attract highly capable people to leadership.

In fact, you have to learn to lead people who are better than you.

That’s big task, but it’s a necessary reinvention.

I outlined 5 ways to attract leaders who are better than you in this post. And I also outlined 6 reasons many leaders lose high capacity people in this post.

Reinvention 3: The Healthy Leader

Everybody has issues. And after a few years in leadership, yours will unmistakably surface.

Your personal demons and issues will infect your leadership, your marriage and your home life. There’s just no escape.

If you’re at that stage right now, there are three stories that might really be able to speak to you:

Perry Noble, on how depression and anxiety almost took him out of leadership.

Craig Jutila, on how his drivenness almost cost him his marriage and his family.

Justin and Trisha Davis, on how their personal issues almost killed their family and cost them their ministry.

Your personal demons will either take you, or you will decide to take them. It’s up to you.

As I share in some of the interviews above, I’m so grateful God gave me the grace and insight to deal with my personal issues along the way.

Reinvention 4: The Life-Long Student

If you’re waiting for the day when you arrive as a leader, you’ll be waiting forever.

As a leader, you should never stop growing. Growing your character is more important than growing your skill set, and yet growing your skill set is also a must.

Many leaders would rather be teachers instead of students. That’s a critical mistake. The leaders who want to be teachers, not students, will never be teachers worth following.

The best teachers are the best students. So be a student.

Do whatever it takes to grow your skill set. Read books and blogs. Listen to podcasts. Go to conferences. Connect with leaders ahead of you. Learn whatever you can.

You’re never done. And if you really want to lead well, you’ll realize how amazing that realization actually is.

Reinvention 5: The Change Agent

In the first 5-10 years of your leadership, you will likely have introduced a lot of change. You moved out the old and brought in the new.

Which is where most leaders get stuck.

Many leaders have the courage to change what someone else introduced. Few have the courage to change what they introduced.

Effective leadership means changing what you introduced. It means looking the people you lead in the eye and saying “For a season, that was the best way to do things. The season’s changed, and we need a new approach.”

As I’ve shared before, leaders need to marry the mission, not the method.

In light of the massive cultural shift happening around us, leaders are going to have to get more and more comfortable with changing what they’ve already changed.

What Do You Think?

Those are 5 reinventions I see most effective leaders move through.

What are some reinventions you’ve had to go through personally? What have you seen in others?

Scroll down and leave a comment.

Joseph barkley

Episode 31: Reaching Hollywood: Keys to Planting a Church Where No One Goes to Church—An Interview with Joseph Barkley

The culture in Hollywood California is as resistant to Christianity as almost any.

Church planter Joseph Barkley shares strategies around community, how to do church and innovation that are making an impact in otherwise resistant city.

Welcome to Episode 31 of the Podcast.

Joseph barkley

Guest Links

JosephBarkley.com

Radius Church

Joseph Barkley on Twitter

Josephy Barkley on Facebook

Links Mentioned

Brad Lomenick

Episode 17; Josh Gagnon

Ecclesia Hollywood

Karl Vaters

Kara Powell

David Kinnaman

 

3 Things You Can Do Right Away

Joseph invested his time and talents to channel a difficult demographic that has traditionally gone unreached. If you’re developing a church plant in unfamiliar territory, here’s how you can get started:

1. Build a community. There is a growing trend that suggests that being part of a community is optional, especially if it’s something you can log into, i.e., social media. Culture creates different habits of community, but because some have settled for an inadequate need for community, they bring that into the church. The opportunity becomes re-learning how you create sacred space for community, how to become transparent and how to build trust. If you’re stumbling your way into community, you want to create simple ways of glimpsing it – low cost, low fear opportunities for others to be themselves. In that space, social connection happens organically.

2. Host a great party. In Hollywood, it made sense for Joseph to organize sophisticated social events to reach out to the un-churched. Joseph and his team use mixers to break the ince with unchurched. Mixers are basically a really well done part, Hollywood style. Many guests can’t believe a church threw it. The goal is to build great relationships in a fun environment.  Ask yourself a few key questions: What’s going on in your city? What are the felt needs? What is the language they’re using? Start by creating bridges there.

3. Up the quality level. The evidence of excellence in the public things you do as a leader gives outsiders clues into what you do privately. How you welcome someone in the church parking lot tells them how you’re going to treat children in the children’s ministry. While excellence is under attack today, it’s better to err on the side of simplicity and excellence than complexity and mediocrity.

Want Incredible Training from Today’s Top Leaders?

Then don’t miss the Orange Conference 2015 on April 29-May 1st in Atlanta.

Learn from leaders like Perry Noble, Jeff Henderson, Jud Wilhite, Jon Acuff, Josh Gagnon and more. I’ll be teaching at the conference as well and have put together a senior leader track designed exclusively for senior pastors, executive pastors and campus pastors.

Register here today.

Quotes from Joseph

A New Episode Every Week…Just Subscribe

The podcast releases every Tuesday morning.

Subscribe for free and never miss out on wisdom from great leaders such as Derwin Gray, Ron Edmondson, Jon Acuff, William Vanderbloemen, Tony Morgan, Frank Bealer, Jeff Henderson, Kara Powell, Casey Graham, Perry Noble, and Andy Stanley.

Subscribe via

iTunes

Stitcher

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Appreciate This? Rate the Podcast.

Hopefully this episode has helped you lead like never before. That’s my goal. If you appreciated it, could you share the love?

The best way to do that is to rate the podcast in iTunes and leave us a brief review! You can do the same on Stitcher and on TuneIn Radio as well.

Your rating and review helps gets the podcast in front of new leaders and listeners. Your feedback also lets me know how I can better serve you.

Thank you for being so awesome.

Next Episode: Mark Batterson

New York Times best-selling author Mark Batterson has written 12 books in ten years that have sold millions of copies.

What’s even more remarkable is he’s done this while planting a church and raising a family. Mark takes us on a rare behind-the-scenes tour to show us his process for writing and how he gets it all done.

Subscribe for free now, and you won’t miss Episode 32.

In the meantime, got a question?

Scroll down and leave a comment! I’d love to hear from you!

secrets leaders won't tell you

11 Secrets Most Church Leaders Won’t Tell You

Leadership is a journey…a journey that’s probably different than you thought it would be before you stepped into leadership.

When I was young, I always thought leaders had it all figured out. That the uncertainty would one day disappear once I had more life and leadership under my belt.

But as you eventually learn, it doesn’t really work that way.

In fact, I think most leaders struggle more than they let on. I know personally, at one point or another, I’ve struggled in each of the areas listed below. But, at the time, because I didn’t want to tell anyone how I really felt, I kept mostly quiet.

Looking back, I realize for too long I kept far too much of it to myself.

You know what keeping it to yourself does, right?

It leaves you isolated. And the silence gives fear power—power it should never have.

secrets leaders won't tell you

11 Secrets Most Church Leaders Won’t Tell You

Just to let you know you’re not alone, and to break the power of darkness by cracking some daylight, here are 10 secrets most leaders won’t tell you:

1. I’m less secure than I appear

The together exterior doesn’t always match the fragile interior.

Security is a journey for sure…a tough one. Most people don’t like insecure leaders. But insecurity is a trap…the more insecure you are, the more you resist telling anyone you’re insecure. And the more they dislike you.

If it helps, I outline 5 signs you’re an insecure leader in this post, and 5 ways to become a more secure leader here.

I think the best way to start dealing with your insecurity is to admit it, and deal with it. Counsellors’ offices and best friends are great places to start with that by the way. So is prayer.

2. Getting close to God isn’t easy

There’s a particular pressure on pastors and church leaders to have a ‘great’ relationship with God.

But the truth is, our relationship is just like anyone else’s relationship with God. It has ups and downs.

Even as a church leader, you go through dry seasons. Okay, maybe especially as a church leader, you go through dry seasons spiritually.

I think church leaders struggle with God in different ways than most people. I outline those ways here.

3. I’m lonelier than I let on

Leadership is complex and involves going through seasons of unpopularity. It also involves making tough calls that can make you the goat, or at least feel like a goat.

Add to that the fact that most of us who are driven type leaders don’t do relationships easily, and sometimes it’s lonelier than it needs to be.

4. It’s hard at home sometimes

Let’s just say it. Our Instagrams lie. It’s not always easy at home.

It’s gotten better over the years, but there have been seasons in my leadership where my family got too much of my unfiltered stress. Not fair. Not fair at all. But true.

Home is hard. Work is hard. Put the two together in an ill-thought through combination and it can be lethal.

I really believe that, in the long run, everything rides on how you lead at home.

5. The criticism hurts

We pretend the criticism doesn’t hurt, but it does, whether we admit it or not.

We put our poker faces on, but deep down it stings.

Tell God.

Tell somebody.

And don’t let your family bear the brunt of it every time.

There are ways to make criticism sting less, but acknowledging it hurts is a great first step.

6. I’m afraid to ask for what I really want

I’ve usually been pretty forward in my leadership and I’m grateful for an incredibly honest dialogue I have with my staff and elder team where I serve.

But there are seasons where I’ve been afraid to ask for what I really want. And even as I type those words I think “That sounds so selfish.”

But sometimes you just need a vacation. Or, especially when your family is young and you’re just starting out, you need a raise. Or you need more staff. Or you need someone to have your back. Or you need a friend. You’re just afraid to ask.

You know what I’ve found? Almost every time I’ve asked, someone said “Why didn’t you ask sooner? We’d love to help.”

See what secrets and silence do?

7. I’ve thought about leaving even though I’m staying

You’ve thought about leaving, even though you’re staying…true? Of course it’s true, unless you just started last Tuesday, and even then…

Everyone goes through seasons of doubt and questions about the future.

But when you sit in silence with this one for too long, you end up waffling. Not staying, but not leaving either. You end up putting in half an effort, and you’re half the leader you could be.

Brad Lomenick offers some great insight in Episode 27 of my podcast about how to know when it’s time to go, and I outlined 5 signs it’s time to move on in this post.

8. My secret job is nothing like this job

One of the reasons leadership is hard is because you deal with so many intangibles. It’s brain work. People management. Conflict management. Getting people to do things they wouldn’t ordinarily do.

On bad days, many leaders I know dream of doing something entirely different. For a season, my escape job was to stack boxes in a warehouse. Because at least if you moved a box, it stayed moved.

9. I feel like I don’t really know what I’m doing

Eventually you reach a level of leadership, either because you’ve been at it long enough or because whatever you’re leading got big enough, that you realize there are no clear answers. There just aren’t.

You surrounded yourself with the smartest people you could and you realize that even the smart people don’t know what to do.

That’s where real leadership begins—when you feel like you don’t really know what you’re doing, but you keep doing anyway.

That’s how history gets changed. You were just the last person standing, even though inside it felt like sheer confusion.

10. People seem to believe in me more than I believe in myself some days

When you’ve been through #9 enough times, you will be ready to give up believing in yourself. But you look around and realize other people keep believing in you.

That’s exactly what you need. You’re likely leading very well if enough of the good people keep believing in you.

So when you stop believing in you, keep believing in the people who believe in you.

11. I thought we would have made more progress by now

You don’t want to say it out loud, but you really do think you would have made more progress by now.

You look at all the overnight successes and think “How come that wasn’t me?” This only works, of course, until you look more closely at the overnight successes only to realize almost all of them were 5-15 years in the making.

The fact that your vision is bigger than your reality is paradoxically a sign that you’re a good leader.

So keep being mildly disappointed, because it will always spur you on to more.

And one day when it’s over you’ll look back and be amazed at how much you actually accomplished.

What Are Your Secrets?

What thoughts do you have that you have a hard time admitting to anyone else?

I’d love to hear them.

And what’s yours experience with these 10?

Scroll down and leave a comment!

Karl_Vaters

CNLP 30: Small Church, Mid-sized Church or Megachurch, Which is Better? An interview with Karl Vaters

Is there a ‘best’ size for church?

Why do so many people distrust mega-churches?

Why do others look down on small churches?

Karl Vaters of NewSmallChurch.com and Carey Nieuwhof engage that debate on this week’s episode and try to settle once and for all whether a small church, mid-sized church or megachurch is best.

Welcome to Episode 30 of the Podcast.

 

Karl_Vaters

 

Guest Links

Karl Vaters on Twitter

NewSmallChurch.com

New Small Church on Facebook

Cornerstone Christian Fellowship

The Grasshopper Myth

Links Mentioned

8 Reasons Most Churches Never Break The 200 Attendance Mark

Josh Gagnon; Episode 17

Purpose Driven Church: Growth Without  Compromising Your Message and Mission

How to Break Church Barriers: Capturing Overlooked Opportunities for Church Growth

Rick Warren

Andy Stanley

Bill Hybels

Perry Noble

The Top 5 Ministry Excuses You Absolutely Need to Stop Making

3 Things You Can Do Right Away

In the end, Karl and I agree every size church plays an indispensable role in the life of the wider Church.

The best thing you can be is the most effective church you can be, and let size take care of itself.

1. Be intentional about what you define as ‘success”. Karl got so caught up into a numbers game, and he lost sight of the purpose of his ministry. He went from “shepherd to rancher” having to focus on administrative tasks while maintaining the church. He took a 40-day sabbatical from preaching and sought counseling, where he learned to redefine what it meant to be successful. Success isn’t just about a number. It doesn’t mean you have to lower the bar. Success in the kingdom of God is not about numbers; it’s something you have to figure out for yourself.

2. Become awesome at what you do. Karl said he had to get out of the mindset that he had to be a big church in order to be successful. He just had to figure out how to “do awesome” on a smaller level, and that was ok. Size has nothing to do with how capable your ministry is. If it leads to growth, it will happen organically, but it’s better to grow when your church and pastor are healthy.

3. Stop making excuses. You can use the post-Christian culture as an excuse for why your church is small, or you can embrace what you have and do phenomenal things in your ministry. There’s a myth that you have to be big to be great, and that’s not necessarily true. Success doesn’t meet a one-size-fits-all formula. When you stop making excuses, you’ll start making progress.

Want Incredible Training from Today’s Top Leaders?

Then don’t miss the Orange Conference 2015 on April 29-May 1st in Atlanta.

Learn from leaders like Perry Noble, Jeff Henderson, Jud Wilhite, Jon Acuff, Josh Gagnon and more. I’ll be teaching at the conference as well and have put together a senior leader track designed exclusively for senior pastors, executive pastors and campus pastors.

Register here today.

Quotes from Karl

A New Episode Every Week…Just Subscribe

The podcast releases every Tuesday morning.

Subscribe for free and never miss out on wisdom from great leaders such as Derwin Gray, Ron Edmondson, Jon Acuff, William Vanderbloemen, Tony Morgan, Frank Bealer, Jeff Henderson, Kara Powell, Casey Graham, Perry Noble, and Andy Stanley.

Subscribe via

iTunes

Stitcher

TuneIn Radio

Appreciate This? Rate the Podcast.

Hopefully this episode has helped you lead like never before. That’s my goal. If you appreciated it, could you share the love?

The best way to do that is to rate the podcast in iTunes and leave us a brief review! You can do the same on Stitcher and on TuneIn Radio as well.

Your rating and review helps gets the podcast in front of new leaders and listeners. Your feedback also lets me know how I can better serve you.

Thank you for being so awesome.

Next Episode: Joseph Barkley

The culture in Hollywood California is as resistant to Christianity as almost any. Church planter Joseph Barkley shares strategies around community, how to do church and innovation that are making an impact in otherwise resistant city.

Subscribe for free now, and you won’t miss Episode 31.

In the meantime, got a question?

Scroll down and leave a comment! I’d love to hear from you!

weekend attendance

10 Simple Changes You Can Make to Help Boost Weekend Church Attendance

There’s no doubt the church is undergoing a massive cultural shift as people attend church less often, and even regular attenders show up less frequently than before. (I outlined that trend in detail in this five part blog series.)

As much as everything is changing and we need to respond to that, almost every church still holds weekend services and likely will for years to come.

So, in the meantime, what can you do to help reach more people? What can you do to boost weekend church attendance?

Before you think this is just a numbers game, realize it’s also a spiritual issue.

To me, declining attendance is a spiritual issue because I believe that disconnected people rarely grow spiritually.

Connect people and they grow. Disconnect people, and they don’t.

So, naturally, I’m motivated to connect people.

Can we connect people outside Sunday? Absolutely. By all means connect people through groups, other gatherings, in local mission and so much more.

And yet this truth remains: the weekend service is, functionally, a primary way most people connect with the church and connect with God.

So to ignore Sundays is to ignore a reality that impacts hundreds of millions of people every week.

weekend attendance

10 Changes You Can Make to Boost Weekend Attendance

So if you’re holding weekend services, what can you do to bump weekend attendance positively, knowing that it will help people connect better to God?

Here are 10 ideas that are relatively simple to implement:

1. Invite, don’t assume

I think many leaders still hold the assumption that if you attend church, you’ll be there weekly. As we’ve seen before, that’s just not true anymore.

So instead of just closing the serve and assuming everyone will be back, invite people to come back. Close the service by saying something like “Next week we’ll be (fill in the blank) and we’d love for you to join us.”

When you change your language this way, you raise the anticipation level.

2.  Facilitate an experience more than a show

As worship has changed over the last generation, in many ways it has become as much of a ‘show’ as it has anything else.

As both David Kinnaman and John Stickl have pointed out on recent leadership podcast episodes (episode 24 and 29 respectively), millennials are far less attracted to ‘the show’ (highly produced, highly generic services) than their boomer parents and grandparents.

If you’re in a large church, the show will be the experience killer. People don’t want to attend something that they can access just as easily via podcast.

If you’re a small church, mediocrity (poorly produced, poorly executed services) will be the experience killer. It’s hard to draw people back to something that’s consistently underwhelming or poorly done.

I think the future will belong to leaders who can facilitate compelling gatherings (large or small) that usher people into the presence of God.

John Stickl provides great insight on how to usher millennials into the presence of God in a megachurch setting. It’s worth the listen.

3. Employ more than one or two senses

I’m a verbal, logical learner, so my default it always just to talk or write.

But I realized a long time ago I need to engage visual learners and other learning styles.

Increasingly, our team is using media like this in our services to help people connect with the full message and impact of the Gospel. In my teaching, I’m using more infographics and images in addition to words to communicate points.

This goes far beyond music, images and words.

Even communion is sensory, something that can’t just be reduced to a few words or yet another bottom line.

Lighting levels, haze and even incense can add to an experience.  You can’t podcast any of those things.

4. Make the next step beyond Sunday clear

Many leaders don’t point to anything beyond the next Sunday’s message (if they do that).

I’m increasingly passionate about helping people find their next step.

Recently at Connexus Church, where I lead, we introduced a Next Steps kiosk at our locations. We staff it with some of our best volunteers who understand our mission and love connecting with people.

We train them to read where people are at and make recommendations on which next step is best for them. For some it may be baptism, for others it might be Starting Point or group, for still others it could be serving or inviting a friend.

The goal is to get people to engage by taking a step. Why? Engaged people grow faster. It’s as simple as that.

They also tend to show up more (but that’s a by-product of their growth).

5. Teach in series

Many preachers now teach in series, but there’s a surprising number who don’t. Next Sunday still consists of whatever the preacher thought up on Monday afternoon (or Saturday night). Bad idea on about a hundred levels.

Teaching in 3 to 10 week message series gives people something to look forward to. Plus, it gives you something new to feature every month or two.

Additionally, series are memorable. I am amazed at how many times people tell me about a series we did years ago that impacted them. They remember the name, the bottom line and even the artwork.

Plus, a new series gives everyone a fresh chance to invite a friend.

6. Angle your messages as connected parts (think ‘episodes’)

If you teach in series, it means you won’t be as tempted to ‘cover all the bases’ in one sermon. You have a series for that.

I try to cover ONE idea per message. No more, no less.

That means you can pick up where you left off the week before after a brief recap of where the series has gone so far.

Rather than pushing people away, that draws people in. It’s why series like Suits, Downton Abbey or House of Cards are so successful. You can’t easily jump into the middle of a season—you need to watch from the beginning.

I’m not suggesting you make your message hard to access for first time attenders. Not at all. Just let them know there’s more that addresses the questions they’re asking.

It will drive people to your podcasts or website to catch up on what they missed, and make them want to come back.

You can still make the message ‘work’ as a standalone, but building continuity with other parts of the series makes it an experience people want to come back to.

And because you’re changing series every 3-8 weeks, you have lots of opportunity to start fresh throughout the year.

7. Give people homework

One aspect of teaching so many preachers miss is application. We give too much information and not nearly enough application.

Preachers, ask yourself, what are people going to do with this message on a Tuesday? If you can’t answer that, don’t preach it.

Sometimes I work harder on the application than I do on other areas of the message. Why? Because people remember what they apply. And because application is everything.

Don’t just ask what people need to know. Ask what people need to do. Then answer that, clearly.

8. Encourage everybody to bring somebody

People who invite people to church with them tend to not miss church.

I would strongly encourage you to elevate the value of inviting and bringing friends. Forget the weekend attendance that might bring.

It’s also one of the best ways for people to grow spiritually. Sharing your faith grows your faith.

Finally, it moves your church far closer to accomplishing its mission; sharing the hope of Christ with the world. Why wouldn’t everybody bring somebody?

9. Specifically invite people to follow you on social media

If your church has a social media presence on Sundays (most do), talk about it!

As I outlined in this post, most of us don’t. What a mistake. Stop greeting people like it’s 1999.

By encouraging people to connect with you via social media, you can connect with them all week long.

10. Make volunteering a great experience

If your volunteers hate serving, they’ll be looking to escape from your church any time they don’t have to be there.

Here’s a post that explains why many churches lose high capacity volunteers.  Here’s another one that outlines 7 questions every volunteer asks but never says out loud.

You want your volunteers to love serving so much that it creates a contagious environment.  In Episode 20 of my leadership podcastFrank Bealer from Elevation Church explains how what Elevation Church does to get thousands of volunteers as passionate about their mission as staff.

Turn around your volunteer culture, and you will have a far more irresistible weekend gathering.

What About You?

Those are some things we’re thinking about and doing around our leadership table to respond to the trend of declining attendance we’re all seeing.

What are you doing? What has enticed you?

Scroll down and leave a comment!

cynicism

6 Reasons Leaders Grow Cynical (And How to Fight the Trend)

Find yourself becoming a little more cynical every year as a leader?

Few of us decide we’re going to be cynical…we just kind of end up there.

How does that happen?

How does a heart grow hard? How do you end up trusting no one? How does hope die?

Cynicism grows in the hearts of far too many leaders. Not only does it impact how you lead at work or in ministry, eventually your growing cynicism will tear at the fabric of your marriage and even at your relationship with your kids. Nobody likes a cynic.

If you find yourself gradually growing more cynical, you’re not alone.

I think leadership breeds cynicism for several reasons. The good news is you can beat it if you understand how it forms.

cynicism

6 Reasons Leaders Grow Cynical

So why do leaders grow cynical? Here are 6 reasons I’ve seen in myself and in others:

1. You know too much

The more you lead, the more you know. And the more you know, the easier it is to grow cynical.

This shouldn’t surprise us at all. Solomon said it 3000 years ago. The wisest man in his day had to battle cynicism at a very deep level (ever read Ecclesiastes?). In Ecclesiastes 1:18 Solomon make the link between knowledge and sorrow crystal clear:

For with much wisdom comes much sorrow; the more knowledge, the more grief.

Boom. There it is.

Think of all you’ve seen as a leader. The heartbreak, the betrayals, the politics, the people you believed in who kept letting you down.

You know too much. You’ve seen too much.

And not knowing how to handle what you’ve seen and what you know creates an incubator for cynicism.

2. You haven’t grieved your losses

Leadership is a series of wins and losses. If you’re like me, you hardly notice the wins, but you feel every loss.

Years ago, a mentor pointed out to me that most pastors never grieve their losses. Every time someone leaves your church, it’s a loss. Every time you do a funeral, it’s a loss. Every time you can’t do what you hoped you could do as a leader, it’s a loss.

Most of us just stuff the losses; pretending they don’t matter.

When I first realized I’d stuffed a lot of losses over my life, I cried. A lot. I mean like almost for a month kind of crying. That seemed to clear the backlog.

Now, when I sense there’s a loss (even a small one), I grieve it before God.

There’s a reason people in Biblical times would declare 40 days of mourning. I used to read those passages and think “What’s wrong with those people? Why can’t they just go back to work?”

Actually, there’s something healthy about grieving your losses.

What do you need to grieve that you haven’t grieved?

3. You haven’t dealt with your issues

In addition to the losses you experience in life and leadership, we all bring baggage with us from the past.

I ran from dealing with my ‘stuff’ for years. After all, I was a good leader. I didn’t have any baggage. I sent people to counselling. I didn’t go to counselling.

How wrong that attitude was. Apparently, I did have baggage. And it was impacting not only my leadership, but my marriage and parenting. I’m so thankful I found some trained Christian counsellors to help me work through my issues.

If any of this is resonating with you, I want to encourage you to jump over to listen to Perry Noble and I tell our stories of burnout and depression in this post (and interview).

4. You’ve projected past failures onto new situations

When you don’t deal with your issues or grieve your losses, you end up projecting past failures onto new situations.

Here’s how cynicism operates.

Cynicism looks at a new team member and says “I’ll bet it’s just a matter of time until he screws up”.

Cynicism looks at a new class of 9th graders and says “They’re just like the kids who drove me nuts last year.”

Cynicism sees the newlyweds and says “I wonder how long until they hit the rocks?”

Cynicism sees the new church and decides “It will only be a matter of time until they implode too.”

If you want to fight cynicism, stop projecting past failures onto new situations.

5. You’ve decided to stop trusting

As soon as cynicism gets a toehold in your life, you stop trusting.

Because the next person is just like the last person, you decide those kind of people can’t be trusted. Or worse, people can’t be trusted.

Really?

Is that how you want to live? What kind of leader does that make you? What kind of person does that make you?

Or, without inducing a guilt trip, what kind of Christ-follower does that make you (isn’t the heart of our faith forgiveness and hope)?

If you want to kick cynicism in the teeth, trust again. Believe again. Hope again.

6. You’ve lost your curiosity

I think an incredibly effective long term antidote to cynicism is curiosity.

The curious are never cynical.

The curious are always interested, always open to new possibilities, always thinking, always hopeful. I wrote a post about the link between cynicism and how to become more curious here.

Because cynicism tends to creep up with age, you’ll notice there are (sadly) a lot of cynical old people. My favourite elderly people are never the cynical, but the curious. The ones who at 80 are still learning, still open, still hopeful, still passionate about the next generation, still optimistic.

When was the last time you were honestly curious about something? Pursue curiosity, and cynicism will die of a thousand pinpricks.

What Kills Cynicism in You?

If you’ve felt cynicism growing inside you, what’s making it grow? What’s helping you beat it?

I’d love to hear from you. Scroll down and add to the conversation by leaving a comment!

John_Stickl

CNLP 29: Next Generation MegaChurch—How Transparency and Seeking God Reaches Millennials: An Interview with John Stickl

At 29, John Stickl became the pastor of a church of 1500.

4 years later, the church is 4500 and is growing with millennials who are anxious to connect with God.

John talks about how his leadership team listens for the voice of God and how this journey has stretched him as a leader. Plus, he shares how a new generation of leaders is defining leadership and ministry to people inside and outside the church.

Welcome to Episode 29 of the podcast.

John_Stickl

Guest Links

John Stickl on Twitter

Valley Creek Church

Valley Creek Church on Facebook

Valley Creek Church on Twitter

Links Mentioned in this Episode

The Orange Conference 2015

OrangeConference.com/SeniorLeader

 

Jeff Henderson

Jenni Catron

Josh Gagnon; Episode 17

Andy Stanley; Episode 1

3 Things You Can Do Right Away

Sometimes God puts you in a position to lead at a very young age, and when you do it humbly in the presence of wise counsel, you allow God to accomplish amazing things through you. Here’s how John stayed encouraged and didn’t let himself feel intimidated.

  1. Learn to listen for God’s voice in leadership. In the Old Testament, the cloud of God’s glory appeared to the Israelites to guide them. When the cloud moved, they moved. When it stopped, they stopped. John said that he and his leadership team relied on the same divine guidance to conquer the obstacles of transition. “We said, ‘Let’s be more like Acts II where everyone can hear the voice of God in a language we can understand, and if we’re seeing God together, God only has one thing to say about any particular issue.’ ” It forced John and his team to unify and seek God where they learned to trust each other. “If we’re not in unity and alignment with God, let’s stop and wait. Let’s pause and see if we’re hearing different things and hear what God’s really saying,” John says.
  2. Establish unity in the top tier of leadership. John set a precedence that his team has total authority as a group and no authority as individuals. “When we hear God together as a decision, it’s the ultimate authority as a group,” he says. If you’re seeking God together, you start creating credibility and consistency over time, and it builds trust and credibility in people’s hearts. You also have to look for people who have character, those who listen to God, who pray, who read their Bible, who seek God, and most importantly, have no agenda. If you can take the agenda out of the equation, you can trust that each person is hearing from God, and it creates unity.
  3. Decide you will not let circumstances define you. Don’t allow your sermons, your failures or comparisons to other church leaders shape who you are. The love of God in your life frees you from the praise and the rejection of man. You can heal your own soul, and the greatest gift we give is the healthiest version of ourselves. If you can be a person of honor, God will honor you because of it.

Want Incredible Training from Today’s Top Leaders?

Then don’t miss the Orange Conference 2015 on April 29-May 1st in Atlanta.

Learn from leaders like Perry Noble, Jeff Henderson, Jud Wilhite, Jon Acuff, Josh Gagnon and more. I’ll be teaching at the conference as well and have put together a senior leader track designed exclusively for senior pastors, executive pastors and campus pastors.

Register here today.

Quotes from John

A New Episode Every Week…Just Subscribe

The podcast releases every Tuesday morning.

Subscribe for free and never miss out on wisdom from great leaders such as Derwin Gray, Ron Edmondson, Jon Acuff, William Vanderbloemen, Tony Morgan, Frank Bealer, Jeff Henderson, Kara Powell, Casey Graham, Perry Noble, and Andy Stanley.

Subscribe via

iTunes

Stitcher

TuneIn Radio

Appreciate This? Rate the Podcast.

Hopefully this episode has helped you lead like never before. That’s my goal. If you appreciated it, could you share the love?

The best way to do that is to rate the podcast in iTunes and leave us a brief review! You can do the same on Stitcher and on TuneIn Radio as well.

Your rating and review helps gets the podcast in front of new leaders and listeners. Your feedback also lets me know how I can better serve you.

Thank you for being so awesome.

Next Episode: Karl Vaters

Is there a ‘best’ size for church? Why do so many people distrust mega-churches? Why do others look down on small churches? Karl Vaters and Carey Nieuwhof engage that debate on this week’s episode.

Subscribe for free now, and you won’t miss Episode 30.

In the meantime, got a question?

Scroll down and leave a comment! I’d love to hear from you!

bias for action

Why Leaders Who Hold THIS Bias Are The Most Effective Leaders

You probably have something exciting that you’ve been thinking about doing for a long time.

Every leader has dreams, goals and hopes.

The challenge is you haven’t done anything about it…yet.

And as a result, so few leaders end up with a track record of accomplishment.

Why?

Because almost all of us struggle with something the most effective leaders in their field don’t struggle with.

What is it?

It’s a bias so few leaders have. But the great ones all possess.

bias for action

Three Friends — One Bias

A few years ago, I began to notice a trend among some friends that were accomplishing a lot.

One good friend was launching a business and was frustrated with the lack of traction he was seeing that week. So he decided to host a webinar…ten days later. Believe it or not, 600 people joined him for it.

I had another friend launched a weekly podcast eighteen months ago, as a side-line to his full time job. This was at a time when I was still thinking about launching a leadership podcast. At the time I was thinking a monthly podcast was a huge commitment. But he launched…weekly. Convicting.

Now to a third friend.  He’s a prolific reader (40-50 books a year) and a super smart thinker and speaker. I told him he needs to write a book. He said he had thought about.

I urged him to do it and so did another friend. Within a few weeks he had sent me draft chapters to review. Amazing.

What do all three leaders have in common?

A bias for action.

Maybe You’re Hallucinating

This challenges me because I tend to think about things a lot before acting.

For example, I thought about hosting a podcast for two years before I launched this one (and, yes, I ended up going weekly in the end).  To date, I’ve only thought about hosting a webinar.

And my next book has been three years in the making (it releases in 2015…thanks for your patience…stay tuned).

Shipping is more important than dreaming. If you don’t act, you’ve got nothing. All you’ve got is a desire.

As Thomas Edison famously said, “Vision without execution is hallucination.”

 Action is Stunning

Action is stunning because so few people actually do it. So few people act on their dreams.

Often the difference between you and the leaders you admire is they acted. You didn’t.

And you know what a desire becomes when it’s never acted on, don’t you? It becomes a regret.

Far too many people waste their potential, squander their vision and languish in mediocrity because they just don’t act.

So why don’t you stun someone this week? Act.

I’ll bet you even stun yourself when you do.

Press Start

Here’s my hunch. You know exactly what you need to do. 

Come on…you know what it is:

That change you need to make in your church

The project you need to launch.

That book you need to write.

The blog you need to get started on.

That team member you need to deal with.

That unchurched neighbour you need to have over for dinner.

That series you need to find the courage to preach.

So what’s holding you back?

Be honest.

Maybe it’s fear.

Or a lack of confidence

Or the belief you might fail.

Well….

The only way to get past fear is to move through it.

The brave aren’t the brave because they don’t feel fear. They’re brave because they pushed through it.

The only way to gain confidence is to do something. So go do it.

Truthfully, your dream is failing right now. You have nothing to lose by acting on your dream except the 100% guarantee of failure that comes from not acting on it.

Now…before you leave a comment (scroll down to add to the conversation), decide what you need to act on.

Then act.

A bias toward action is a bias every effective leader has. So get moving.

warren_bird (2)

CNLP 28: How To Create High Performing Teams in Any Size Organization—An Interview with Warren Bird

Whether your church or organization is large or small, it needs a team. Better than that, it needs a high performing team.

How do you get one in place? Warren Bird studied some of the best teams around today, and shares his findings.

Welcome to Episode 28 of the podcast.

warren_bird (2)

 

Guest Links

WarrenBird.com

Warren Bird on Twitter

Leadership Network

Teams that Thrive: Five Discipline of Collaborative Church Leadership

How to Break Church Growth Barriers: Capturing Overlooked Opportunities for Church Growth

Links Mentioned in this Episode

The Orange Conference 2015

OrangeConference.com/SeniorLeader

Andy Stanley; Episode 1

Perry Noble; Episode 2

Casey Graham; Episode 3

Kara Powell; Episode 4

Tony Morgan; Episode 6

Rich Birch; Episode 8

Jon Acuff; Episode 9

Pete Wilson;  Episode 11

Frank Bealer; Episode 20

Will Mancini; Episode 23

David Kinnaman; Episode 24

Jenni Catron; Episode 25

The Drive Conference 

The Advantage: Why Organizational Health Trumps Everything Else in Business by Patrick Lencioni

Cracking your Church’s Culture Code: Seven Keys to Unleashing Vision and Inspiration by Samuel R. Chand

The 7 Practices of Effective Ministry (North Point Resources) by Andy Stanley

3 Things You Can Do Right Away

Your team is one of the biggest assets to leadership, and how you function as a group can either accelerate or kill the growth of your ministry. Warren Bird has worked with multiple churches and compiled a series of research to determine how teams can be more productive and what forwards the church’s mission.

1. Kill church conflict. Replace it with constructive debate. More than anything else, church conflict kills growth. Do whatever you need to do to stop the bickering, fighting and quarrelling that kill far too many churches and organizations.

Instead, replace it with constructive debate.  The way to have a constructive debate is to ensure your team is aligned around a common mission, vision and strategy. When that happens, real discussion is much more constructive and productive. If you’re wondering how to get the right people around the leadership table, I wrote a post on who you can trust in leadership here.

2. Break the lone leader model. Even if you have no team, create one. For example, if you do hospital visitation as a pastor, bring someone with you next time. Never lead alone. Start training, empowering and releasing your team. The first step is to stop leading alone.

3. Decide which level of delegation you’ll assign to your team. Delegation within teams happens in multiple stages:

a. Tell me what you think I ought to do, and then we’ll do it together.

b. Tell me what you’re going to do and then proceed.

cb. Take care of it, but let me know what happened.

d. Take care of it. As the leader, I don’t need to know what happened.

So often, misunderstandings happen because of a miscommunication about delegation. Understanding your level of empowerment is part of the rhythm of a healthy team and a delegated ministry.

People can’t read your mind as a leader. If you’re stalled on making a decision, you’re never going to grow.  If you have to wait every month or every week to make a decision, you can’t respond and be lean enough to make the kind of calls you need to make in the moment as a team.

Want Incredible Training from Today’s Top Leaders?

Then don’t miss the Orange Conference 2015 on April 29-May 1st in Atlanta.

Learn from leaders like Perry Noble, Jeff Henderson, Jud Wilhite, Jon Acuff, Josh Gagnon, and today’s guest, Jenni Catron (and more). I’ll be teaching at the conference as well and have put together a senior leader track designed exclusively for senior pastors, executive pastors and campus pastors.

Register here today.

Quotes from Warren

 A New Episode Every Week…Just Subscribe

The podcast releases every Tuesday morning.

Subscribe for free and never miss out on wisdom from great leaders such as Derwin Gray, Ron Edmondson, Jon Acuff, William Vanderbloemen, Tony Morgan, Frank Bealer, Jeff Henderson, Kara Powell, Casey Graham, Perry Noble, and Andy Stanley.

Subscribe via

iTunes

Stitcher

TuneIn Radio

Appreciate This? Rate the Podcast.

Hopefully this episode has helped you lead like never before. That’s my goal. If you appreciated it, could you share the love?

The best way to do that is to rate the podcast in iTunes and leave us a brief review! You can do the same on Stitcher and on TuneIn Radio as well.

Your rating and review helps gets the podcast in front of new leaders and listeners. Your feedback also lets me know how I can better serve you.

Thank you for being so awesome.

Next Episode: John Stickl

At 29, John Stickl became the pastor of a church of 1500.

4 years later, the church is 4500 and is growing with millennials who are anxious to connect with God.

John talks about how his leadership team listens for the voice of God and how this journey has stretched him as a leader.

Subscribe for free now, and you won’t miss Episode 29.

In the meantime, got a question?

Scroll down and leave a comment! I’d love to hear from you!